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3 edition of Oral contraceptive pill use and the risk of stroke - a meta-analysis of observational studies found in the catalog.

Oral contraceptive pill use and the risk of stroke - a meta-analysis of observational studies

Wee-Shian Chan

Oral contraceptive pill use and the risk of stroke - a meta-analysis of observational studies

by Wee-Shian Chan

  • 64 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by National Library of Canada in Ottawa .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (M.Sc.) -- University of Toronto, 2000.

SeriesCanadian theses = -- Thèses canadiennes
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 microfiche : negative. --
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21605540M
ISBN 100612534774

Introduction: Oral contraceptives (OCs) are considered as one of the most common risk factor of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in child bearing age. Some of the recent researches indicate that the odds of VTE may be even higher with newer generations of OCs. The present meta-analysis was designed to evaluate the effect of different generation of OCs on the occurrence of VTE.   Iodice S, Barile M, Rotmensz N, et al. Oral contraceptive use and breast or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1/2 carriers: a meta-analysis. European Journal of .

In order to minimize the risk of contraceptive failure, she should use an extended or tricycling regimen with a pill-free interval of 4 days. Also advise the woman to avoid sexual intercourse or use a barrier method of contraception (such as condoms) while taking, and for 28 days after stopping, the liver enzyme-inducing drug. Oral Contraceptives Increase Stroke Risk? Oral contraceptives (OCs) containing progestin and/or estrogen are the most popular reversible form of contraception in the United States. More than 10 million women in the U.S. use OCs, although safety concerns have .

Background: In addition to the contraceptive action of the combined oral contraceptive pill (COCP), there are a number of other benefits to its use such as menstrual cycle r, COCP use is also associated with a higher risk of thromboembolism. Despite the prevalence of COCP use, studies have indicated that overall women have poor knowledge of the COCP.   Birth control pills increase risk of stroke in women with other risk factors Researchers found a slight increase for all women on the pill, but much more for women already at risk of a : Stephen Feller.


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Oral contraceptive pill use and the risk of stroke - a meta-analysis of observational studies by Wee-Shian Chan Download PDF EPUB FB2

The risk of hemorrhagic stroke was further increased in OC users with additional risk factors including current smoking, hypertension, and history of migraine.

CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis of observational studies suggests that current use of OCs could contribute to a small increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke, and the increased risk is Cited by: 1. A more recent meta-analysis of studies from to published in focused on evaluating the risk of acute thromboembolic events with OCP use, and found a two-fold increased risk of ischemic stroke associated with OCP use (OR, ; 95%CI, ).

The results of these two meta-analyses are similar to our by: Nearly all the research on the link between oral contraceptives and cancer risk comes from observational studies, both large prospective cohort studies and population-based case–control studies.

Data from observational studies cannot definitively establish that an exposure—in this case, oral contraceptives—causes (or prevents) cancer. Recommendations on the risk of ischaemic stroke associated with use of combined oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy in women with migraine.

The International Headache Society Task Force on Combined Oral Contraceptives & Hormone Replacement Therapy. Cephalalgia. ; – doi: / by: 2. To determine whether oral contraceptive use is associated with increased stroke risk.

Searching Index Medicus (before ), MEDLINE (after ), BIOSIS Previews (after ) and Dissertation Abstracts Online (North American Universities) were searched using the following keywords: oral contraceptives (side-effects, complications), stroke Cited by:   Oral contraceptives (OCs) are prescribed to more than 10 million US women and million women worldwide.

1,2 Efficacy and ease of use are well established, 3 but concerns about safety have persisted since their introduction in 4,5 Some studies have suggested that OC use is associated with increased risk of stroke, venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, 9,10,26 Cited by:   This meta-analysis showed that the risk of myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke was fold increased in women using COCs.

The risk was highest for pills with > 50 microgram estrogen. When combined with the results of studies on the risk of venous thrombosis in COC users, it seems that the COC pill containing levonorgestrel and 30 µg of estrogen is the safest oral form of combined oral.

Context The relationship between ischemic stroke and oral contraceptive (OC) use has been studied for 40 years, but disagreement about an association ive To review available. Conclusions: This meta-analysis of observational studies suggests that current use of OCs could contribute to a small increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke, and the increased risk is related to.

Current use of oral contraceptives and the risk of first-ever ischemic stroke: A meta-analysis of observational studies 2 nd International Conference and Exhibition on Pharmaceutical Development and Technology MayOsaka, Japan. Ying Li, Zhenlin Xu and Shaowen Tang.

Nanjing Medical University, China. Scientific Tracks Abstracts: J. Current OC use was associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke. RR = (95% CI:; P. Study selection. Studies were included that had >10 cases of ischaemic stroke or cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, a clear differentiation of ischaemic and hemorrhagic stroke, a cohort or case control design with control patients gathered within 2 years of stroke, sufficient data to compare oral contraceptive use with non-use, a design or analysis that controlled for age, and no later.

DATA SYNTHESIS: The 16 studies were analyzed using random effects modeling. Current OC use was associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke (RR, ; 95% CI, ). Smaller estrogen dosages were associated with lower risk (P for trend), but risk. Birth control pills nearly double the risk of stroke, according to a new review article.

For women who take the Pill and also smoke, have high blood pressure or have a history of migraine. Women who take birth control pills are at an increased risk for ischemic stroke, a type of stroke triggered by blood clots, according to a new study Author: Traci Pedersen. The combined oral contraceptive pill (COCP), often referred to as the birth control pill or colloquially as "the pill", is a type of birth control that is designed to be taken orally by women.

It includes a combination of an estrogen (usually ethinylestradiol) and a progestogen (specifically a progestin).When taken correctly, it alters the menstrual cycle to eliminate ovulation and prevent First use: (United States).

The pill is the most commonly used contraceptive method and approximately 50–80% of Australian women use it at some stage during their reproductive lives. 7 There is now a large range of products available with over 30 different registered brands.

While many of these pills contain similar hormones and doses, there are multiple formulations for the prescriber to consider (). This meta-analysis of oral contraceptive use in relation to myocardial infarction is based on 19 case-control studies and 4 cohort studies that met pre-stated inclusion criteria.

A comprehensive literature search was performed using the MEDLINE computerized database (for studies from January through October ).Cited by:   Background Use of the oral contraceptive pill (OCP) has been reported to be associated with stroke.

With current OCPs containing less than 50 µg of ethinyl estradiol, and many earlier studies reporting the association between OCPs and stroke, subjected to biases, we determined whether such an association exists and, if so, the magnitude of the by: Five studies, including ours, have directly compared the effect of the use of second- and third-generation oral contraceptives on the risk of myocardial infarction, with reported odds ratios Cited by:.

relevant, 73 examined oral contraceptive use and risk for ischaemic stroke, and 16 (2 cohort and 14 case control studies) met the selection criteria. Meta›analysis showed that women who were currently using oral contraceptives had a higher risk for ischaemic stroke than those who were not currently using oral contraceptives (weighted.

Birth control pills increase the risk times, to strokes perwomen, according to a well-performed “meta-analysis” cited in the report. (A meta-analysis combines the results of multiple studies.) This is still a small risk; 24, women would have to take birth control pills to cause one additional stroke, according to the report.

Women using low-dose oral contraceptives are at an increased risk for a heart attack or stroke while taking the pill -- however the risk disappears after discontinuation, according to a Virginia.